Happy Birthday, Galileo!

Yesterday (sorry, Galileo...day late) was your birthday. Of course, you were born 458 years ago in 1564. 

Here's some music that you might like. It was written during your lifetime and is played on your favorite instrument, the lute, which I understand you were pretty good at!Your Padre, Vincenzo Galilei was an awesome lutenist, or so I understand. I just read on our internet (thats a way of sharing informazione with people all over the world...you would have loved it!) that you might have been experimenting with your father "...in 1588–89 on the relationship between pitch and the tension of strings..." Ha! a great combination of science and music! I found out a lot about you and your padre from the https://www.britannica.com/biography/Galileo-Galilei

But you are a huge player in my piece, Opus Magnanimous, largely because of what you did with telescopes! "...only when people discovered how to increase the strength of our eyesight with the use of magnifying lenses made of glass were we able to begin to see the true nature of the universe..." Your love of music and curiosity about the nature of our universe helped us all to see deeper into the seemingly impenetrable clouds between us today and our almost infinitely far-off birth millions of years ago. 

So thanks to you, Galileo Galilei, and thanks to your Padre, Vincenzo. Ours hats are off to you on your 458th birthday. Maybe by the time (with the help of our even bigger telescope, the James Webb, and more new scopes to come) you have your 500th birthday, we'll have seen real evidence of the birth of our universe in the Big Bang. Maybe! But in the meantime, my music, with a few cues from the curious musician-scientists of past centuries and the narration which follows the story of our historical star-gazing ancestors and cheers for the efforts of our modern-day scientists will hopefully entertain and enlighten anyone who ventures to listen...

PS I uploaded that really neat picture of you from that same Britannica page. The Britannica folks grabbed it from 

Galileo 

Galileo, oil painting by Justus Sustermans, c. 1637; in the Uffizi Gallery, Florence. 

SCALA/Art Resource, New York

 

1 comment

  • Rooney Baxter
    Rooney Baxter
    Demonstrated that robbers, by an edge of however much 30 to 40 percent, will more often than not stay away from homes with thief caution frameworks, as the investigation further discovered [url=https://empiresmarthomes.ca/]empiresmarthomes.ca[/url] "an introduced thief alert makes a residence less alluring to the would-be and dynamic gatecrashers.

    Demonstrated that robbers, by an edge of however much 30 to 40 percent, will more often than not stay away from homes with thief caution frameworks, as the investigation further discovered empiresmarthomes.ca "an introduced thief alert makes a residence less alluring to the would-be and dynamic gatecrashers.

Please or register to post.

Add comment